This was not the end of A

Buchan portobello scotland blue stoneware jug dating

Portobello was one

The range of wares made at Portobello, spanning two centuries, covered much of the ceramic spectrum. Favourite above all proved to be the Thistle pattern never officially named comprising a semi- stylised grouping featuring a thistle, heather, and bluebells, all on a sky blue background. This was not the end of A. About a dozen of these were given names, but the total number ran into three figures.

The rise of Alexander

They were famed for their patented white marmalade jars. Even then it was not totally finished, as a lone potter, Joe Hunter, and a single decorator, Karen Cramb, continue to keep the Buchan name alive. The rise of Alexander Buchan to the fore heralded a sixty- year period during which vast quantities of stoneware goods of all descriptions were manufactured.

The rise of Alexander Buchan to the fore heralded a sixty-year period during which vast quantities of stoneware goods of all descriptions were manufactured. Portobello was one of the main centres of industrial ceramic production in Scotland, dating back to the s or thereby. Initially of a single uniform colour, a range of multi- coloured patterns developed under the guidance of Eric McKinnon Buchan. Having been one of the few Scottish potteries to have survived the Depression, A. However, having been one of the few Scottish potteries to have survived the Depression, A.

Instead, the manufacture of utilitarian stoneware was all but given up and replaced with a product of a quite different character - decorative stoneware. Portobello Pottery Portobello was one of the main centres of industrial ceramic production in Scotland, dating back to the s or thereby.